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  Carolina Satyr      Hermeuptychia sosybius     Brush-Foots:
Satyrs and Wood Nymphs
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Comments:
Appearing more like a drab moth, the Carolina Satyr is a small brown butterfly with a low, weak flight. Common throughout the Southeast, the species shows up regularly in many residential yards. Between periodic bursts of activity, adults perch on grasses or leaf litter with their wings tightly closed. With care, they can be easily approached for observation. Males readily patrol for females.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Gemmed Satyr      Cyllopsis gemma     Brush-Foots:
Satyrs and Wood Nymphs
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Comments:
Often overlooked, the Gemmed Satyr is one of the most attractive members of the subfamily Satyrinae (satyrs and wood nymphs) in Florida with its beautifully marked hindwings. It is the only Florida satyr without eyespots. It dances along the forest floor with a weak, low flight. Although difficult to follow through the understory vegetation, adults regularly alight on grass blades or leaf litter. The slender larvae have both a green and brown form.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Georgia Satyr      Neonympha areolata     Brush-Foots:
Satyrs and Wood Nymphs
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Comments:
Unusually colorful, the Georgia Satyr tends to be less frequently encountered than most of its common cousins. Adults have a low, weak flight and bob slowly among the tall grasses and surrounding vegetation. Although often localized and spotty in distribution, the butterfly cannot be confused with any other satyr or wood nymph in the state. Little detailed information is available about the biology and behavior of the species including the exact larval hosts utilized in the wild.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Viola's Wood Satyr      Megisto viola     Brush-Foots:
Satyrs and Wood Nymphs
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Comments:
Viola's Wood Satyr scurries along the forest floor with a quick, bobbing flight and periodically lands on leaf litter or low vegetation with wings tightly closed. Like most satyrs, it does not visit flowers but instead is drawn to sap flows and rotting fruit. The large yellow-rimmed eyespots presumably help deflect attack away from the insect's vulnerable body. With even a good portion of its wing missing, the butterfly can still fly and will live to see another day.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Common Wood Nymph      Cercyonis pegala     Brush-Foots:
Satyrs and Wood Nymphs
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Comments:
The Common Wood Nymph is a mediumsized butterfly primarily encountered in open, grassy meadows and fields, though it may also be found in forest clearings and margins. Within the state, it is infrequent and often highly localized. Adults have a low, relaxed flight and bob erratically through the vegetation. Well camouflaged when resting, it can be a challenge to locate or follow. Unlike most satyrs, it is an opportunistic feeder and frequently visits flowers along with sap flows and fermenting fruit.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Southern Pearly Eye      Enodia portlandia     Brush-Foots:
Satyrs and Wood Nymphs
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Comments:
The Southern Pearly Eye is Florida's largest satyr. Adults have a quick, bobbing flight and frequently alight on low vegetation or leaf litter. The butterfly has a spotty distribution but may be locally abundant when found. Like most satyrs, adults do not visit flowers. They instead prefer to feed at sap flows, rotting fruit, decaying vegetation and dung.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   

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