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  Sleepy Orange      Eurema nicippe     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
Much debate centers on the origin of the butterfly's common name. One interpretation points to its narrow black forewing spot, which to many observers resembles a closed eye. Nonetheless, the Sleepy Orange is far from lethargic. Adults are extremely active and have a quick, nervous flight. Another of Florida's migratory species, individuals produced late in the season move south and overwinter in reproductive diapause. Newly emerged males often gather in large numbers at mud puddles or damp ground.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Orange Sulphur      Colias eurytheme     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
Although common and widespread throughout much of North America, the Orange Sulphur is infrequently encountered in Florida. It has a low, rapid flight. Fond of open, weedy sites, the species is particularly abundant in and around cultivated alfalfa fields, where it occasionally can become a serious pest. Males often gather at moist ground or gravel.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Large Orange Sulpur      Phoebis agarithe     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
The Large Orange Sulphur is an abundant butterfly throughout the Keys and coastal portions of the mainland. Adults have a strong, directed flight but are fond of flowers and regularly stop to nectar. Males occasionally visit moist ground. It is restricted to south Florida and rarely disperses northward.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Barred Sulphur      Eurema daira     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
The Barred Sulphur is a common butterfly of open, weedy sites throughout Florida, where it is particularly abundant in the late summer and early fall. Adults have a quick, dancing flight and typically bob among low vegetation. Like many other sulphurs, the butterfly displays dramatic seasonal variation in color and behavior. Individuals produced during the summer months are short-lived, reproductively active and almost immaculate white beneath. Winter-forms have highly pigmented and patterned ventral hindwings and overwinter in reproductive diapause.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Dainty Sulpher      Nathalis iole     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
As its name implies, the Dainty Sulphur is Florida's smallest yellow butterfly. It flies low among the vegetation and is easily overlooked. It is common throughout the year in southern portions of the state but less numerous and often quite local in occurrence further north. Adults regularly congregate at damp ground.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Little Sulphur      Eurema lisa     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
The Little Sulphur has a low, darting flight and an affinity for dry, open habitats. Although found throughout the year in Florida, it is particularly abundant in the late summer and early fall. Like other members of the genus, it produces different seasonal forms that vary in coloration, behavior and reproductive activity.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Southern Dogface      Zerene cesonia     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
The only Florida sulphur with pointed forewings, the Dogface is a medium-sized butterfly with a powerful, rapid flight. It is named after the unique pattern formed by the black and yellow markings on the wings above that resemble (with some imagination) the head of a dog in profile. Adults display considerable seasonal variation. Winter-forms are particularly stunning with rich pink scaling on the wings beneath. They overwinter in reproductive diapause.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Cloudless Sulphur      Phoebis sennae     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
The Cloudless Sulphur is a large yellow butterfly with a fast, powerful flight. Abundant throughout the Southeast, it is a common garden visitor and one of the most easily recognized butterflies in Florida. Adults have an extremely long proboscis and can feed at many long, tubular flowers typically inaccessible to other butterflies. Fall individuals undergo a massive, southward migration into Florida to overwinter. The annual event is one of the sunshine state's most impressive natural phenomena.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   
         
  Orange-barred Sulphur      Phoebis philea     Sulphurs and Whites:
Sulphurs
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Comments:
Named for its distinct orange forewing band in males, the Orange-barred Sulphur is a large yellow butterfly with a strong and rapid flight. Found year-round in south Florida, it regularly moves northward each year to temporarily colonize additional portions of the peninsula. It is rare or absent from the panhandle. Unlike many butterfly species, it is at home in more urban locations were its ornamental larval hosts commonly occur. The butterfly became established in Florida sometime during the late 1920s and has become an abundant resident.
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Dorsal (Top View) on left.
Ventral (Bottom View) on right.
   
   
   

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